In a stunning victory for the psychedelic movement and the world at large, Oregon passes Measure 109, becoming the first state to approve magic mushrooms for psychotherapeutic use. Adding to this drug policy victory was the passing of Measure 110, a progressive initiative aimed at decriminalizing drugs and creating more robust addiction treatment programs. 57.9% percent of voters voted to approve 109 while 42.1% voted not to–effectively making history once again for US leader in progressive drug policy. 

Oregon’s State Health Authority Will Create Program to Administer Psilocybin 

The measure will allow the Oregon state health authority to establish a program for legally administering psilocybin products to people 21 and older. Given the widespread criminal prohibition of psychedelic drugs in the US, passing of this historic measure marks a monumental milestone for psychedelics and the greater mental health movement. In a recent Microdose original blog on Oregon’s extraordinary drug policy initiatives, the measure’s campaign manager, Sam Chapman, discussed the severity of the mental health crisis in Oregon and the significant need for better treatment options. Alongside his warranted concern for the current state of affairs in Oregon, Mr. Chapman expressed excitement about the opportunity for Oregon to create the first ever state level program for psilocybin therapy.

Pioneering the Path Ahead in Progressive Plant Medicine Policy 

Plant medicine activists in Oregon have a significant advantage over the rest of the country having also been one the first in the country to legalize cannabis. As other parts of the country are finally making progressive strides in cannabis policy in this very moment (such as New Jersey), the residents of Oregon have once again established an important precedent in plant medicine policy. Considering the incredibly powerful therapeutic potential entheogenic plants have on society in this time of great need, such a vote couldn’t come at a more necessary time. Indeed, medicinal plants such as ibogaine, ayahuasca, and magic mushrooms have been caught in the crossfire of a grisly, politically motivated “War on Drugs”. As the world begins to heal from it’s tragic fallout, Oregonian’s once again have established a powerful new paradigm of progress in the treatment of mental health.

Learn more about the Microdose documentary project “The World on Drugs”, a bold commentary aimed at shifting global drug policy and exploring psychedelic medicine. 

“Yes” On Measure 110 Means Decriminalization & Expanded Substance Abuse Treatment

Also on the ballot was Measure 110, a progressive initiative aimed at decriminalizing drugs and creating more robust and accessible addiction treatment programs. In another historic first for the state, Oregon will be the first U.S. state to decriminalize all drugs in addition to legalizing psilocybin. Such progressive strides in drug policy reform come at a tumultuous point in our collective evolution as a species. The “War on Drugs” has been one of the most destructive social experiments and examples of failed policy in our time. Psychedelic medicine and more progressive and healing drug policy reform offers us the opportunity to heal from the devastation caused by these harmful policies.

Looking Ahead to the Future for Oregon & The World At Large

These dramatic developments that have unfolded in Oregon have set the stage for a powerful next act in the rapidly evolving psychedelic renaissance. As the political climate continues to shift and unravel over the coming days and weeks, the future for psychedelic medicine seems more certain than ever before, regardless of party politics. Between the FDA granting breakthrough therapy status to psilocybin and MDMA, and these powerful policy changes, psychedelics are making massive progress and breakneck speeds. These initiatives passed by Oregon set the stage for a brighter future for not only the citizens of Oregon, but the world at large.

Read: 3 Reasons Psychedelic Medicine is Projected to Win Bipartisan Support Ahead of 2020 Elections