For more deep insights and expert commentary on the mushrooming world of fungi therapeutics, such as Therapsil and their novel advocacy efforts to promote psilocybin therapy, be sure to check out The Mushroom Conference: A Molecular Masterclass on Nov 20-22nd. The conference features over 70 world renowned experts and is sure to engage, inspire and excite. You can get tickets here!

 

The Canadian non-profit organization, Therapsil, has helped achieve yet another massive milestone for the psychedelic renaissance: the first non-palliative care Canadian has gained approval to legally receive psilocybin-assisted therapy. The advocacy group supported the patient, Mona Streleaff, through the application process and will allow her to receive the treatment under a Section 56 exemption. The monumental decision was made by Canada’s progressive Minister of Health, Patty Hajdu, a defining force in Canada’s progressive drug policy reform movement. 

 

Read: Canada Health Minister Calls to Keep Injectable Opioid Therapy Treatment Program in Alberta Open

 

Threrapsil Successfully Supports Both Palliative and Non-Palliative Canadians Gain Legal Access to Psilocybin Therapy

Helping Mona gain access to psilocybin therapy to treat her mental illness is the latest achievement in the advocacy group’s diligent efforts to expand access to psychedelic medicine for Canadians. Earlier this year, Therapsil helped four Canadians with terminal cancer gain legal access to psilocybin therapy–another historic achievement for psychedelic medicine. These landmark decisions help establish a powerful precedent for the future of mental health treatment not just in Canada but around the world. 

Today, the number of groundbreaking clinical studies demonstrating psilocybin’s efficacy in addressing serious issues like depression and end-of-life anxiety is steadily growing. Amidst the current pandemic and mental health crisis, Therapsil’s efforts couldn’t come at a more necessary time.

Read: New Study in Rats Reveals Genes Responsible for Psilocybin-Induced Neural Plasticity

A Closer Look at Therapsil & the Emerging Landscape of Psilocybin-Assisted Psychotherapy

Helping patients gain legal access to psilocybin is only the first step in successfully integrating psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy into modern society. Mona’s experience strongly reflects this. Mona’s description of her undeniably challenging experience offers unique insight into the landscape of this evolving therapy modality. She is quoted as saying “all the unresolved trauma, it came back and I was beyond terrified, shaking uncontrollably and crying.” 

Such powerfully emotional experiences are not at all uncommon when working with psychedelics–especially when the intention is to work through trauma. Mona’s experience strongly spotlights the need for highly trained clinicians and therapists in this evolving landscape. It is up to the therapist to ensure patient safety and provide guidance on how to work through past traumas, address anxieties and face fears during the therapy session. 

Despite the challenging nature of her experience, Mona had an overall positive report about her psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy session, thanks to her therapist and doctor. She stated that through their help, she “conquered those tough memories” and felt like she “won the battle” in her head “for the first time”. She claims that her depression and anxiety are now gone. Even though the memories are not, Mona says she knows they can’t hurt her now–a powerful testament to the therapeutic value of psychedelic medicine.

The Mushroom Conference: A Molecular Masterclass will spotlight the dynamic field of psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy by offering deep insights from leading experts in the field. The conference is from Nov 20-22nd and is sure to engage, inspire and educate about the mushrooming field of fungi therapeutics. Get your tickets here today!

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Therapsil Is Now Looking to Expand Psilocybin Access to Psychotherapists 

Therapsil’s next mission is to allow psychotherapists to be allowed to experience the psychedelic medicines they administer firsthand. Charles Grob, a professor of psychiatry at UCLA, has teamed up with other leading researchers, academics and practitioners to pen a letter to Health Minister Hajdu to advocate for this expanded access. He, like many other experts in the field, believe that experiential training “allows the psychotherapist to more effectively guide their patient and thus optimize safety and likelihood of a therapeutic outcome.” The decision is expected to arrive at the end of the month. Stay tuned to Microdose for this developing story!

 

For a truly interactive immersion into the mushrooming fungi space, make sure to join us at The Mushroom Conference: A Molecular Masterclass on Nov 20-22nd!

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